If you follow me on Instagram you have seen that I like to set up morning invitations for my kiddos. This means I am setting up an activity at night when the kids go to sleep, that they can wake up and do as soon as they get up. So many times I’m using from our themed units and this Fruit and Vegetable Graphing is one that I have done as a morning invitation. 

With this preschool activity we worked on identifying colors, sorting, counting, and graphing. Yep, that’s right graphing for preschoolers, but it’s totally age-appropriate when done right.

Lil’ Explorers Focus Skills

Science

  • Use graphs and charts to describe data

Patterns

  • Sort objects based on two characteristics; size, color, shape, texture, or weight

Algebraic Thinking

  • Count from 0-10
  • Understand values of numbers 0-10

Visual Arts

  • Identify basic colors

Lil’ Creators Focus Skills

Science

  • Use graphs and charts to describe data

Patterns

  • Sort objects based on two characteristics; size, color, shape, texture, or weight

Algebraic Thinking

  • Count from 0-20
  • Understand values of numbers 0-20

Visaul Arts

  • Identify basic colors and understand that you can combine colors to make new colors

Required Materials

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Scroll of Paper

*Pretend Food

*Markers

Step #1

On a large piece of butcher paper draw a graph.

Ours was 7×4

Step #2
Color in the graph with markers. Try to make it so that each color has a different number colored in.

We used 6 green, 7 red, 4 purple, and 5 orange.

Be sure that you actually have a enough of each color. So don’t color in seven green spaces, if you only have five green pieces

Step #3
Layout pretend food that coordinates with the colors and numbers you’ve put on your graph.
Step #4
Invite your preschooler to place the food on the graph accordingly.

Teacher Tip

The conversations you have with your preschoolers will really make or break the activity. Even if you let them do it independently, which I often do, make sure you come back when they’ve completed it and talk about what they’ve done. Ask them things like, “How did you know that this apple went here,” or, “Which group has more: the red or the green?” These conversations allow your preschooler to put vocabulary to all of the work they’ve just done and it allows them to take their thinking to another level. When your preschooler gets to kindergarten, you’re going to notice that the question is no longer, “Can you complete x,” but rather, “How do you complete x,” or, “Why did that work?” We are more interested in the process than the product. 

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