It is time for handprint art! No preschool program would be complete without handprint art! Art (even structured art like this) gives your Lil’ the opportunity to be creative. They get to see that they can create a product from a variety of materials. When your Lil’ engages in the arts, they are practicing more skills than you think; they are working on their language development, decision making skills, visual-spatial awareness, motor skills, and inventiveness. Preschool can get a bad rap for just doing “arts and crafts,” but those arts and crafts are more valuable than you are often led to believe. Bonus, today’s “arts and crafts” include science!

Lil’ Explorers Focus Skills

Science

  • Pose “what,” and “why” questions about their surroundings

Visual Arts

  • a variety of visual art materials (paint, markers, crayons, clay) with minimal adult assistance
  • Use visual arts to represent people, places, and things, using spatial awareness to coordinate the features of the representation

Lil’ Creators Focus Skills

Science

  • Pose “what,” “why” and “how” questions about their surroundings

Visual Arts

  • a variety of visual art materials (paint, markers, crayons, clay) with minimal adult assistance
  • Use visual arts to represent people, places, and things, with accuracy and detail

washable paint

White paper

Markers

GLUE

Paint brush

paper plate

wipes

Step #1
Paint your child’s hand brown and place their handprint at the bottom of the paper with their fingers spread apart and pointed down; this will be the roots.
Step #2
Across the top of your child’s handprint draw a horizontal line to create the surface of the ground.
Step #3
Paint your child’s hand red and place their handprint slightly above the line you drew. There should be no space between their fingers and their hands can be pointing right or left. You can do this twice to create two “strawberries”
Step #4
When the paint dries, let your child draw two stems from the strawberries to the roots and draw the black seeds on the strawberries
Step #5
Paint your child’s thumb green and dot the stems to create the leaves
Step #6
Once your paint has dried, you can help your child label each part of the plant (roots, stems, leaves, fruit, seeds) as you talk about what each part does (roots soak up water and nutrients, stem takes the water from the roots to the plant, leaves help the plant get food, fruit is for us and animals to eat, and seeds allow new fruit to grow).